jump to navigation

The passing of Taloolema’agao Uliulileava Olano, the great Samoan chief and boat builder February 2, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

In September of 2011, we posted a story about the very interesting history of the canoe that is on display in the stairwell of the Social Science Tower —
Samoan canoe in Social Science Tower

We were all very sad to learn of the recent passing, on Monday, January 25th, of Taloolema’agao Uliulileava Olano, the Samoan chief and canoe builder, from relatives in Western Samoa. Affectionately known as Uliuli, he was 84 years old. He is survived by his loving children and grandchildren.  Bill Maurer, the Dean of the School of Social Sciences, has been planning an event to commemorate the making of the canoe this spring, as part of the 50th Anniversary celebration here at UCI. One of Uliuli’s granddaughters, upon learning of this event, shared that “It would be a great honor and a dream come true to see what my grandfather built. He was such an inspiration to everyone around him and was dearly loved by all. His legacy will continue to live on. Thank you for acknowledging my grandfather’s work.” A niece shared this: “We are very thankful for all his hard work he has set forth, his teachings and encouragements will never be forgotten. We lost not only a dear relative, but a great late chief.” Another granddaughter said: “He was known as a man of wisdom, strong and always proud of his family as well as his culture. He is gone but will never be forgotten.”

Below are photographs of Uliuli while he was here at UCI, showing his expertise as a boat builder and the canoe he built at the Social Science Farm in 1968. We also have two videos of Uliuli that were given to Special Collections and Archives by the Department of Anthropology.
One video (on the right) shows the canoe being built and , the other (on the left) shows the launch of the canoe in Newport Bay and the canoe in numerous locations in Newport Bay and in the Pacific Ocean — https://goo.gl/6EPxjE

Documenting Uliuli’s life while here and other activities at the Farm during that era was an exhibit on campus in 2012  — http://sites.uci.edu/thefarm/
Also, a book, Learning and Doing at the Farm, written by former UCI graduate students Robert J. Kett and Anna Kryczka was published in 2014 — http://soberscove.com/book/learning-by-doing/

Our thoughts are with all of the relatives and many friends of Taloolema’agao Uliulileava Olano. He truly was a great man. His funeral took place in Western Samoa on Wednesday, February 3, 2016.

Untitled-2 Untitled-3 Untitled-4 Untitled-5 Untitled-6 Untitled-7 Untitled-8 Untitled-1

The first Frisbee on this date in 1957, and Ultimate Frisbee at Crawford Field in 1980 January 23, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Athletics, Campus Scenes, Uncategorized.
Tags: , ,
add a comment
as-061_s00154_017

as-061_s00154_017

as-061_s00154_018

as-061_s00154_018

On this date, January 23rd, in 1957, the Wham-O toy company issued the first Frisbee.

In Bridgeport, Connecticut, William Frisbie opened the Frisbie Pie Company in 1871. Students from nearby universities would throw the empty pie tins to each other, yelling “Frisbie!” In 1948, Walter Frederick Morrison and his partner Warren Franscioni invented a plastic version of the disc called the “Flying Saucer” that could fly further and more accurately than the tin pie plates. After splitting with Franscioni, Morrison made an improved model in 1955 and sold it to the new toy company Wham-O as the “Pluto Platter”–an attempt to cash in on the public craze over space and Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs).

In 1958, a year after the toy’s first release, Wham-O changed the name to the Frisbee disc, misspelling the name of the historic pie company. A company designer, Ed Headrick, patented the design for the modern Frisbee in December 1967, adding a band of raised ridges on the disc’s surface–called the Rings–to stabilize flight. By aggressively marketing Frisbee-playing as a new sport, Wham-O sold over 100 million units of its famous toy by 1977.

High school students in Maplewood, New Jersey, invented Ultimate Frisbee in 1967. UCI students have always been addicted to the various Frisbee games that have been invented over the years, from Ultimate Frisbee (shown in the photos above in 1980), to Frisbee Golf, Freestyle Frisbee, etc.

Today, at least 60 manufacturers produce the flying discs–generally made out of plastic and measuring roughly 20-25 centimeters (8-10 inches) in diameter with a curved lip. The official Frisbee is owned by Mattel Toy Manufacturers, who bought the toy from Wham-O in 1994.

January 19, 1962 — Daniel G. Aldrich Jr. is appointed the first UCI Chancellor January 19, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus.
Tags: ,
add a comment

With a site for the new University of California, Irvine campus selected and William Pereira chosen as the architect, Clark Kerr’s next step was to select a new Chancellor for the campus. On January 19, 1962, Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr., age 44, the University’s Statewide Dean of Agriculture, was appointed the first UCI Chancellor. He would be at UCI for 22 years.

as-061_s00029_013

as-061_s00029_013

November 29, 1965 — Anteaters mascot triumphant ballot winner! December 1, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Anteaters, Early UCI Campus, mascots, Student Life, Zot!.
Tags: ,
add a comment

On Monday, November 29, 1965, the Anteater was elected as the official UCI mascot, gaining more student votes than others on the ballot. The results were: Anteater (559 votes); None of these (121 votes); Sea Hawks (113 votes); Centaurs (47 votes); Roadrunners (42 votes); Toros (37 votes); Bison (31 votes); and there were 49 Write-in votes. The options on the ballot were suggested by students through a petition process, proposed mascots needed a minimum of 100 supporting signatures. Prior to the vote, the UCI administration had suggested possible mascots, and even went so far as to have a local artist produce the designs below for Mariners, Explorers, Toros, Clippers, and Dolphins. The idea of anteaters as a possible mascot was conceived in the summer of 1965 by Pat Glasgow as he sat in the sun, working as a Newport Beach lifeguard. In the fall, Glasgow and three other Camino dorm residents — Schuyler Bassett and the twins Bob and Bill Coleman — promoted the idea through buttons and cheers at water polo and basketball games, such as “Give ’em the tongue, give ’em the tongue, give ’em the tongue, where? Right in the ear, right in the ear, right in the ear, Zot!” and a deafening “Zot” after every score. Happy 50th, Anteaters!

Dolphins

Dolphins

Clippers

Clippers

Toros

Toros

Explorers

Explorers

Mariners

Mariners

 

 

Peter the Anteater turns 50! November 29, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Anteaters, School spirit, Student Life, Zot!.
add a comment

Happy Birthday, Peter the Anteater! There’s no other mascot quite like you, and we’re so proud to have you represent our campus spirit!

You are our joy, our inspiration, and we look to you with endearing pride. You’re fierce, snuggly, and the handsomest in all of UC Irvine history.

For your birthday, we made you an album of 50 photos from our 50 years together. Happy birthday! Hope you celebrate with the biggest ant-cake! Zot Zot Zot!

19651201_Page_5

Photos from University Communications [AS-061]; Spectrum; Collection on the Anteater Mascot [AS-144]; UCI Libraries photographs

December 1, 1965 — UCI’s first basketball game November 10, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Athletics, Early UCI Campus, School spirit, Student Life.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

The UC Irvine basketball team won their first game against UC Riverside on December 1, 1965 after two “ex-officio” players – Chancellor Dan Aldrich and UC Riverside’s Chancellor Ivan Hinderaker – competed for the ball during the opening tip off.  The first UCI Athletic Director Wayne Crawford addresses the crowd before the game, Head Coach Dan Rogers prepares the team, the cheerleaders are cheering, and there isn’t an empty seat in the gym!

 

Chancellors Aldrich and Hinderaker at tipoff

The team lined up before the game

Chancellors Aldrich and Hinderaker

Getting ready to start the game

Cheerleaders

UCI Men's basketball team

Cheerleaders

October 29, 1965 – California Governor Edmund “Pat” Brown visiting campus November 3, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Early UCI Campus.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

On Friday, October 29, 1965, California Governor Edmund “Pat” Brown, the father of current Governor Jerry Brown, visited the UCI campus. He was provided with a tour of the new campus by Sam McCulloch, Jack Peltason, the first University Librarian John Smith and others.

as-061_a65-521_003 as-061_a65-521_004 as-061_a65-521_007 as-061_a65-521_008 as-061_a65-521_010 as-061_a65-521_017 as-061_a65-521_002

October 4, 1965 — First Day of Classes October 4, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus, Student Life.
Tags:
add a comment

The first day of classes was Monday, October 4, 1965. Enrollment for the fall quarter 1965 was 1,589 students and there were 118 faculty members. Landscaping didn’t exist yet, but planting was about to start. Faculty looked to be only a few years older than most students. Hallways, even then, were overcrowded with students trying to locate their classrooms.

as-061_a65-518_009[1]

as-061_a65-518_008[1]

as-061_a65-519_006[1]

as-061_a65-520_005[1]

as-061_a65-509_001[1]

 

First coffee shop on campus in Fall 1965 October 2, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Early UCI Campus, Student Life, Uncategorized.
Tags: ,
add a comment

National Coffee Day was celebrated earlier this week, on Tuesday, September 29th. We believe that one of the first places one could get a cup of coffee on campus was at the coffee shop on the bottom floor of the Gateway Commons (now the Gateway Study Center). That coffee shop is now the space occupied by the Orange County and Southeast Asian Archive Center (OC&SEAA). Photographs below show the coffee shop in the fall of 1965. Coffee and the ubiquitous cigarettes… at least in 1965 they were everywhere!

as-061_a65-519_001[1]
as-061_a65-519_002[1]

September 26, 1965 — First Students move in and the first Convocation October 1, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Early UCI Campus.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Fifty years ago, on Sunday, September 26, 1965, Mesa Court opened and 500 students moved into the residence halls on that day. Mesa Court was the first residence hall community at UCI. It is now the largest student community on campus, housing 1,834 undergraduates in 29 residence halls.  Each hall accommodates between 54 and 71 residents in suite-style layout.  Mesa Court now houses mainly first year students.

The first Convocation also took place on that same day in Campus Hall (now Crawford Hall). Student representative Diane Holt gave the keynote address, saying “What a truly beautiful campus this is! We are indeed fortunate to be able to pursue our education in such inspiring surroundings…. We are small in number, but we have much to do…. As our late President John Fitzgerald Kennedy said, ‘Let us begin.'” Other speakers included Chancellor Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr., President Clark Kerr, Regent Philip L. Boyd, Professor James B. Hall, and Executive Secretary of the Interfaith Council Cecil E. Hoffman gave the invocation.
[University Communications Photographs. AS-061]

Mesa Court construction in January 1965

Mesa Court construction in January 1965.

Move in day in September 1965, as the campus opens.

Move in day on September 26, 1965, as the campus opens.

Check-in on move-in day, September 1965.

Check-in on move in day, September 26, 1965.

A Convocation reception was held in the Commons (now Gateway Study Center) From left: Chancellor Aldrich, Regent John E. Canaday, Mrs. Harry R. Wellman, Regent Philip L. Boyd, President Kerr, William L. Pereira, and Vice Chancellor Peltason.

The Convocation reception was held in the Commons (now Gateway Study Center) From left: Chancellor Aldrich, Regent John E. Canaday, Mrs. Harry R. Wellman, Regent Philip L. Boyd, President Kerr, William L. Pereira, and Vice Chancellor Jack Peltason.

 President Clark Kerr is at the rostrum at the Convocation. Faculty and distinguished guests are also on stage. Parents and friends filled the hall to capacity of over 2,000.

President Clark Kerr is at the rostrum at the Convocation. Faculty and distinguished guests are also on stage. Parents and friends filled the hall to capacity of over 2,000.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: