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UCI Stories exhibit opens Monday, May 23 May 20, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Activism, Anteaters, Athletics, Campus Scenes, Collections, College of Medicine, Early UCI Campus, Faculty, mascots, Orange County, Photographs, School spirit, Student Life, Uncategorized, University Archives, Zot!.
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Ready for 50+ anteater antics told through conversations between former and current anteaters? Zot zot! Anteaters come together to share memories, events, and changes throughout UC Irvine’s 50 years of history.

The UCI Libraries announce the opening of an exciting new exhibit called UCI Stories: 50th Anniversary Oral History Project, on Monday, May 23rd at 6:30PM in Langson Library, UCI. RSVP here: http://partners.lib.uci.edu/ucistories/rsvp

UCI Stories

Inspired and imprinted with words spoken during the filmed oral histories, UCI Stories highlights the bright past and brilliant future of UCI through the memories, reflections, and predictions of its community. Artfully curated quotes of campus leaders, innovators, alumni, faculty and staff, document how over the past 50 years, UCI has given birth to generations of community-oriented difference-makers driven by a pioneering spirit that has permeated the campus long before a physical building ever stood on the land. UCI Stories captures how this spirit glues UCI together, and often after graduation calls Anteaters back home. Every great story has three main parts: characters with whom you can identify, a memorable and imaginable setting, and a plot based on the unexpected experiences of protagonists. This is UCI Stories.

Opening night speakers are Robert Cohen (UCI Claire Trevor Professor of Drama, Emeritus/Founding Faculty), Jenny Doh ’91 (UCI’s First Student Regent/Past President, UCI Alumni Association), Elizabeth Toomey (Daughter of Founding Chancellor Aldrich/Retired UCI Assistant Vice Chancellor, Community and Government Relations), and Joseph L. White (UCI Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Psychiatry), will engage in a fascinating conversation on UCI’s history and thoughts for the future; with panel moderation by Krystal Tribbett, UCI Libraries 50th Anniversary Project Historian.

The program will be followed by a light reception and exhibit viewing in Langson Library, UCI. The event is free and open to the public. Space is limited; reservations are first come, first served.

UCI Stories Program, May 23

UCI Stories Program. May 23, 2016.

Please go to http://partners.lib.uci.edu/ucistories/rsvp to make an online reservation. For further information please call 949.824.4651 or email partners@uci.edu.

The UCI Stories Project is a unique oral history project, launched by UCI Libraries, that pairs over 100 UCI affiliates for dynamic conversations to commemorate UCI’s 50th Anniversary. The reminiscences collected offer first-hand perspectives that tell the multifaceted story of UCI’s intellectual contributions, key turning points, and unique legacy. The UCI Libraries’ 50th Anniversary Exhibit, “UCI Stories” is a product of this effort.

More information is available here: http://news.lib.uci.edu/events/spring-2016-exhibit-opening-uci-stories

The passing of Taloolema’agao Uliulileava Olano, the great Samoan chief and boat builder February 2, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus.
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In September of 2011, we posted a story about the very interesting history of the canoe that is on display in the stairwell of the Social Science Tower —
https://ucisca.wordpress.com/2011/09/13/samoan-canoe-in-social-science-tower/

We were all very sad to learn of the recent passing, on Monday, January 25th, of Taloolema’agao Uliulileava Olano, the Samoan chief and canoe builder, from relatives in Western Samoa. Affectionately known as Uliuli, he was 84 years old. He is survived by his loving children and grandchildren.  Bill Maurer, the Dean of the School of Social Sciences, has been planning an event to commemorate the making of the canoe this spring, as part of the 50th Anniversary celebration here at UCI. One of Uliuli’s granddaughters, upon learning of this event, shared that “It would be a great honor and a dream come true to see what my grandfather built. He was such an inspiration to everyone around him and was dearly loved by all. His legacy will continue to live on. Thank you for acknowledging my grandfather’s work.” A niece shared this: “We are very thankful for all his hard work he has set forth, his teachings and encouragements will never be forgotten. We lost not only a dear relative, but a great late chief.” Another granddaughter said: “He was known as a man of wisdom, strong and always proud of his family as well as his culture. He is gone but will never be forgotten.”

Below are photographs of Uliuli while he was here at UCI, showing his expertise as a boat builder and the canoe he built at the Social Science Farm in 1968. We also have two videos of Uliuli that were given to Special Collections and Archives by the Department of Anthropology.
One video (on the right) shows the canoe being built and , the other (on the left) shows the launch of the canoe in Newport Bay and the canoe in numerous locations in Newport Bay and in the Pacific Ocean — https://goo.gl/6EPxjE

Documenting Uliuli’s life while here and other activities at the Farm during that era was an exhibit on campus in 2012  — http://sites.uci.edu/thefarm/
Also, a book, Learning and Doing at the Farm, written by former UCI graduate students Robert J. Kett and Anna Kryczka was published in 2014 — http://soberscove.com/book/learning-by-doing/

Our thoughts are with all of the relatives and many friends of Taloolema’agao Uliulileava Olano. He truly was a great man. His funeral took place in Western Samoa on Wednesday, February 3, 2016.

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The first Frisbee on this date in 1957, and Ultimate Frisbee at Crawford Field in 1980 January 23, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Athletics, Campus Scenes, Uncategorized.
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On this date, January 23rd, in 1957, the Wham-O toy company issued the first Frisbee.

In Bridgeport, Connecticut, William Frisbie opened the Frisbie Pie Company in 1871. Students from nearby universities would throw the empty pie tins to each other, yelling “Frisbie!” In 1948, Walter Frederick Morrison and his partner Warren Franscioni invented a plastic version of the disc called the “Flying Saucer” that could fly further and more accurately than the tin pie plates. After splitting with Franscioni, Morrison made an improved model in 1955 and sold it to the new toy company Wham-O as the “Pluto Platter”–an attempt to cash in on the public craze over space and Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs).

In 1958, a year after the toy’s first release, Wham-O changed the name to the Frisbee disc, misspelling the name of the historic pie company. A company designer, Ed Headrick, patented the design for the modern Frisbee in December 1967, adding a band of raised ridges on the disc’s surface–called the Rings–to stabilize flight. By aggressively marketing Frisbee-playing as a new sport, Wham-O sold over 100 million units of its famous toy by 1977.

High school students in Maplewood, New Jersey, invented Ultimate Frisbee in 1967. UCI students have always been addicted to the various Frisbee games that have been invented over the years, from Ultimate Frisbee (shown in the photos above in 1980), to Frisbee Golf, Freestyle Frisbee, etc.

Today, at least 60 manufacturers produce the flying discs–generally made out of plastic and measuring roughly 20-25 centimeters (8-10 inches) in diameter with a curved lip. The official Frisbee is owned by Mattel Toy Manufacturers, who bought the toy from Wham-O in 1994.

January 19, 1962 — Daniel G. Aldrich Jr. is appointed the first UCI Chancellor January 19, 2016

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With a site for the new University of California, Irvine campus selected and William Pereira chosen as the architect, Clark Kerr’s next step was to select a new Chancellor for the campus. On January 19, 1962, Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr., age 44, the University’s Statewide Dean of Agriculture, was appointed the first UCI Chancellor. He would be at UCI for 22 years.

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October 4, 1965 — First Day of Classes October 4, 2015

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The first day of classes was Monday, October 4, 1965. Enrollment for the fall quarter 1965 was 1,589 students and there were 118 faculty members. Landscaping didn’t exist yet, but planting was about to start. Faculty looked to be only a few years older than most students. Hallways, even then, were overcrowded with students trying to locate their classrooms.

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Historic UCI Films Now Available Online September 29, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus.
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A significant collection of films documenting UCI’s history are now available through the Online Archive of UCI History. These films depict early construction and groundbreaking on campus, dedication ceremonies, early graduation ceremonies, and many early scenes on campus. baseball

UCI’s First Trailer (and RV!) Park May 18, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus, Student Life, Uncategorized, University Archives.
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Irvine Meadows, UCI's first trailer and RV park, circa 1976

Irvine Meadows, UCI’s first trailer and RV park, circa 1976. From UCI Communications photographs, AS-061, a76-094_003

When UCI first opened in 1965, the city of Irvine did not exist and ranchland covered most of the surrounding area, leaving few options for student housing.  UCI’s first dormitory, Mesa Court, housed 500 students in the first year. Although Mesa Court expanded, so too did the number of admitted students. UCI began facing a serious housing shortage on campus. Some students slept in their cars to avoid long commutes and high rent, a common practice in the late sixties and early seventies.

In early 1972, a student group known as the Squatters Club proposed the creation of a camper, van, and RV park. The UCI Housing Office and ASUCI supported the idea. In November that year, Dean of Students Robert Lawrence proposed a plan for the creation of the site to the Campus Planning Committee. Despite wide support for the camper park, nothing was officially established.

Site plan for RV park, circa 1972.

Site plan for RV park, circa 1972. UCI Central Records, AS-004. Box 199, Folder 935-10

Then, in 1973, Irvine and other surrounding cities passed ordinances prohibiting sleeping in cars overnight. This sparked the administration to allocate twelve spaces near the Social Sciences Farm. Occupants were required to have insurance on the vehicle and sign an occupancy agreement. It was named, “Irvine Meadows.”

Student reading outside of his RV in the newly opened Irvine Meadows, circa 1974

Student reading outside of his RV in the newly opened Irvine Meadows, circa 1974. From UCI Communications photographs, AS-061, a74-061

By 1976, over 33% of students commuted ten miles or more to get to campus. On-campus housing was completely full and had a waitlist of 1200 students. Irvine Meadows, meant as a temporary location, still existed even though it did not provide utilities or any extra facilities. It had a wait list of over 100 people. With a growing student body the administration again faced a student housing crisis. Administrators including Chancellor Dan Aldrich and the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs approved a proposal for a site to accommodate 100 vehicles and build bathroom and laundry facilities. In July 1977, the Board of Regents approved funding for the expanded RV park and, after several roadblocks, opened “Irvine Meadows West” on November 15, 1979.

Proposed site for RV park, 1976.

Proposed site for RV park, 1976. AS-004, Central Records. Box 199, Folder: 935-10

Upon opening, the new RV park did not live up to the original vision nor students’ expectations. The original plan included 100-units, a community building for meeting areas, a kitchen, indoor pool, outdoor recreation facilities and vegetable garden, and complete irrigation and landscaping. The actual site included space for 80 vehicles, a small service building with laundry facilities, and no outdoor recreation, garden, or landscaping. “It’s really no picnic living here,” said John Marinovich, quoted in the New U just weeks after the opening. The first residents reported numerous problems with poor construction and inadequate facilities.

However, by 1982 it was a popular housing alternative and deemed a success by the director of housing and food services. Landscaping was added and it exuded an off-beat, bohemian charm with colorful trailers and a vibrant community. There were plans to expand it, but these were never carried out. In 1999, the administration announced that Irvine Meadows would close in five years. In July 2004, Irvine Meadows closed to make room for new construction.

Irvine Meadows West, circa 1988

Irvine Meadows West, circa 1988. From UCI Communications photographs, AS-061, a88-804

Student in his RV, circa 1974

Student in his RV, circa 1974. From UCI Communications photographs, AS-061, a74-061_001

Early UCI Landscaping November 30, 2014

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In 1965, while the campus grounds were being prepared for the first trees and plants, the campus landscape architects viewed some of their options for the first plantings. With the help of the University’s Agricultural Field Station near El Toro, seeds and cuttings from Southern California and from botanical gardens in the area were prepared for planting on campus.

Aldrich Park (formerly Campus Park) being prepared for new landscaping in 1965.

Aldrich Park (formerly Campus Park) being prepared for new landscaping in 1965.

Campus landscape architects at the Agricultural Field Station near El Toro.

Campus landscape architects at the Agricultural Field Station near El Toro.

I Wish It Would Rain May 14, 2014

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus, Photographs.
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On December 21, 1967, the Temptations released (on Motown Records) one of the greatest rain songs of all time, “I Wish It Would Rain.” Lead vocal by the great David Ruffin, with background vocals by Eddie Kendricks, Melvin Franklin, Paul Williams, and Otis Williams. A terrific song, and one I can’t get out of my mind the last several days as the temperature rises daily, and is headed for 100 degrees today.  I do wish it would rain, but that’s unlikely to happen soon. However, as an alternative respite from the heat, here are a few pics of one of the earliest rain storms on the UCI campus, from November 1966.

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Vietnam War Moratorium, October 15, 1969 May 14, 2014

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On October 15, 1969, the Vietnam War Moratorium was held across the country, as a national attempt to end the Vietnam War. On the UCI campus, alternative education classes were held in Aldrich Park (then called Campus Park) throughout the day. A rally was held at noon in Gateway Plaza. There was a march to nearby institutions involved in war production and research, and the day ended with a memorial service for those who had died in the war. Below are photographs of the rally and flyers regarding the Moratorium and the schedule of alternative education classes and other activities.

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Moratorium Bulletin #1, announcing the Moratorium.

Moratorium Bulletin #1, announcing the Moratorium.

Alternative education and activities schedule.

Alternative education and activities schedule.

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