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UCI Libraries Zinefest! Oct 26, 12-4pm October 18, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Anteaters, mascots, School spirit, Student Life, University Archives, Zot!.
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Last year, we brought UCI Libraries Zinefest to UC Irvine! Zines are short for “fanzines”, which are DIY mini-magazines that allow anyone to express their opinions in a fun and cost effective way. Zinefest combined educational and creative aspects to form an engaging event open to students and the public, allowing them to express their unique opinions, ideas, and concerns in the form of a zine. Attendees were also able to listen to three guest speakers. These speakers were educational, bringing attention to resources available to the public to express themselves and research further into zines.

Uncultivated Rabbits represent their zine, Uncultivated Underground

The student organization Uncultivated Rabbits represents their zine, Uncultivated Underground.

Zinefest succeeded in reaching out to and educating the UCI community about zines as well as the UCI Libraries’ collections, and how anyone can express their ideas and thoughts easily through creating a zine.

Students creating zines.

Students creating zines.

After the success of last year’s Zinefest, the UCI Libraries will continue this fun tradition of public outreach to the Anteater Community. There are fun and new things in store for this year’s event, which is held during International Open Access Week, an international celebration of public access to information. One of UCI’s contributions to this international event is Zinefest, allowing free access to information and viewing of zines, along with showcasing the information resources that UCI’s libraries have to offer.

In addition to the previous year’s activities, including DIY zine making, guest speakers, and presentations on resources UCI offers to the public, 2016 brings the opportunity to contribute to a community zine. This will provide a format for the community to work collaboratively on zines, inviting participants to come together and express their opinions with their fellow Anteaters.

We'll also have buttons! And the button maker, so you can make your own.

We’ll also have buttons! And the button maker, so you can make your own.

This year, attendees will be able to create their own DIY zines and buttons, encouraging the UCI community to be creative and expressive. The event is free, and if you choose, you can donate your zine to the UCI Libraries’ zine collection. Plus, you will even be able to meet Peter the Antreader!

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Peter the Antreader getting his zine on!

Zinefest 2016 will host even more guest speakers than the year before. Attendees will get the opportunity to hear from speakers with a wide variety of focuses. Speakers include returning speaker Professor Jeanne Scheper from the Gender and Sexuality Department. This year there will be new speakers, including zinesters Ziba Perez Zehdar and Jon-O Gazdecki of ZebraPizza Zine (http://threeamigospress.tumblr.com/). Alison Regan of the UCI Libraries and Tamara Austin of the Cross Cultural Center will also speak to audiences. In addition, the public will get the chance to see an exhibition of the UCI Libraries’ collection of zines. This exhibition will be curated by Laura Uglean Jackson, Assistant University Archivist of the Special Collections Archives.

Combine all of these fun opportunities that Zinefest has to offer, and the event this year is sure to be one for the books! Zinefest 2016 is on October 26th, from 12-4 PM, so make sure to bring your friends and stop by the Gateway Plaza next to Langson Library for one of the most fun and educational events hosted by the UCI Libraries of the year. The UCI Libraries can’t wait to see you there!

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Program information and updates are available on the facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1600629183570288/

 

UCI Stories exhibit opens Monday, May 23 May 20, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Activism, Anteaters, Athletics, Campus Scenes, Collections, College of Medicine, Early UCI Campus, Faculty, mascots, Orange County, Photographs, School spirit, Student Life, Uncategorized, University Archives, Zot!.
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Ready for 50+ anteater antics told through conversations between former and current anteaters? Zot zot! Anteaters come together to share memories, events, and changes throughout UC Irvine’s 50 years of history.

The UCI Libraries announce the opening of an exciting new exhibit called UCI Stories: 50th Anniversary Oral History Project, on Monday, May 23rd at 6:30PM in Langson Library, UCI. RSVP here: http://partners.lib.uci.edu/ucistories/rsvp

UCI Stories

Inspired and imprinted with words spoken during the filmed oral histories, UCI Stories highlights the bright past and brilliant future of UCI through the memories, reflections, and predictions of its community. Artfully curated quotes of campus leaders, innovators, alumni, faculty and staff, document how over the past 50 years, UCI has given birth to generations of community-oriented difference-makers driven by a pioneering spirit that has permeated the campus long before a physical building ever stood on the land. UCI Stories captures how this spirit glues UCI together, and often after graduation calls Anteaters back home. Every great story has three main parts: characters with whom you can identify, a memorable and imaginable setting, and a plot based on the unexpected experiences of protagonists. This is UCI Stories.

Opening night speakers are Robert Cohen (UCI Claire Trevor Professor of Drama, Emeritus/Founding Faculty), Jenny Doh ’91 (UCI’s First Student Regent/Past President, UCI Alumni Association), Elizabeth Toomey (Daughter of Founding Chancellor Aldrich/Retired UCI Assistant Vice Chancellor, Community and Government Relations), and Joseph L. White (UCI Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Psychiatry), will engage in a fascinating conversation on UCI’s history and thoughts for the future; with panel moderation by Krystal Tribbett, UCI Libraries 50th Anniversary Project Historian.

The program will be followed by a light reception and exhibit viewing in Langson Library, UCI. The event is free and open to the public. Space is limited; reservations are first come, first served.

UCI Stories Program, May 23

UCI Stories Program. May 23, 2016.

Please go to http://partners.lib.uci.edu/ucistories/rsvp to make an online reservation. For further information please call 949.824.4651 or email partners@uci.edu.

The UCI Stories Project is a unique oral history project, launched by UCI Libraries, that pairs over 100 UCI affiliates for dynamic conversations to commemorate UCI’s 50th Anniversary. The reminiscences collected offer first-hand perspectives that tell the multifaceted story of UCI’s intellectual contributions, key turning points, and unique legacy. The UCI Libraries’ 50th Anniversary Exhibit, “UCI Stories” is a product of this effort.

More information is available here: http://news.lib.uci.edu/events/spring-2016-exhibit-opening-uci-stories

New Exhibit “Speaking Up: Fifty Years of Student Publications at UCI” May 2 – July 22 April 21, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Activism, Student Life, University Archives.
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title print (002) JPG

Speaking Up: Fifty Years of Student Publications at UCI
Monday, May 2, 2016 through Friday, July 22nd, 2016, (Special Collections & Archives, 5th Floor of Langson Library)

Speaking Up: Fifty Years of Student Publications at UCI showcases a variety of student-generated writing from throughout the history of the campus. Bringing together periodicals, newsletters, literary magazines, and other materials from University Archives in Special Collections & Archives, this exhibit examines how students and student organizations make their voices heard within the UCI community and beyond. The publications reflect engagement with many pressing issues, from political debates about war and peace to efforts to promote equality and diversity in the curriculum, on the campus, and in society more broadly.

The exhibit is a joint effort of the UCI Libraries’ Special Collections & Archives and the UCI Office of the Campus Writing Coordinator.

Curated by Steve MacLeod, Public Services Librarian, and Laura Uglean Jackson, Assistant University Archivist. Assisted by Jens Lloyd, Campus Writing Fellow. Additional assistance from Allison Dziuba, Maureen Fitzsimmons, Lance Langdon, and Jasmine Lee.

A Look Back on Clayton Garrison August 17, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Faculty, Photographs, Uncategorized, University Archives.
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Staff at UCI Special Collections and Archives were sad to learn that Clayton Garrison, founding dean of UCI’s School of Fine Arts, passed away on July 27, 2015. Garrison once recalled in 1974 that he was attracted to Irvine because it was an “opportunity to initiate, in a new situation, a program that was different from any other programs in the fine arts on a University of California campus.” And so, when he joined UCI in 1964, he set out to build a “studio- and performance-centered” fine arts program at the undergraduate level.

To him, “starting a whole school involving art, dance, drama, music, and film with only five faculty members was a rare opportunity.” Garrison recruited some of the top artists in their field to join the School of the Fine Arts’ founding faculty including Eugene Loring who was appointed Chairman of Dance, and who introduced ballet as a study in the University of California curriculum. Robert Cohen, who Garrison directed in a Shakespeare play at UC Berkeley, was appointed chair of UCI’s Drama Department. In 1964, Garrison appointed John Coplans as Director of the University Art Gallery. Coplans, editor for Artforum magazine, was well connected with the contemporary art world, and he influenced Garrison by suggesting new faculty recruits. One of the first art professors Coplans recruited was Tony DeLap, and the faculty grew to include Larry Bell, Ed Bereal, Vija Celmins, Ron Davis, Robert Irwin, Craig Kauffman, Philip Leider, John Mason, Ed Moses, Barbara Rose, and Alan Solomon.

Garrison also invited renowned artists, including David Hockney and Roy Lichtenstein, to serve as guest lecturers and teachers at what he believed was a truly interdisciplinary fine arts program.

Garrison served as dean of the school for its first 17 years, during which he did everything from direct plays, operas and musicals, to choreograph stage, teach, help establish UCI’s esteemed M.F.A programs, and more. After retiring as dean, he spent nine years teaching acting and running UCI’s month long Music Theater Program in New York. The projects that Garrison helped produce at the School of Fine Arts, now known as the Claire Trevor School of the Arts, and beyond were well-received with high praise from the campus and region alike.

Prior to his appointment at UCI, Garrison was Chair of the Department of Drama and Vice Chair of the Division of Humanities at UC Riverside. He also taught at UC Santa Barbara and the Laguna College of Art + Design.

The UCI Special Collections and Archives is pleased to house Clayton Garrison’s collection documenting his work in theater at UCI, New York, and internationally.

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UCI’s First Trailer (and RV!) Park May 18, 2015

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus, Student Life, Uncategorized, University Archives.
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Irvine Meadows, UCI's first trailer and RV park, circa 1976

Irvine Meadows, UCI’s first trailer and RV park, circa 1976. From UCI Communications photographs, AS-061, a76-094_003

When UCI first opened in 1965, the city of Irvine did not exist and ranchland covered most of the surrounding area, leaving few options for student housing.  UCI’s first dormitory, Mesa Court, housed 500 students in the first year. Although Mesa Court expanded, so too did the number of admitted students. UCI began facing a serious housing shortage on campus. Some students slept in their cars to avoid long commutes and high rent, a common practice in the late sixties and early seventies.

In early 1972, a student group known as the Squatters Club proposed the creation of a camper, van, and RV park. The UCI Housing Office and ASUCI supported the idea. In November that year, Dean of Students Robert Lawrence proposed a plan for the creation of the site to the Campus Planning Committee. Despite wide support for the camper park, nothing was officially established.

Site plan for RV park, circa 1972.

Site plan for RV park, circa 1972. UCI Central Records, AS-004. Box 199, Folder 935-10

Then, in 1973, Irvine and other surrounding cities passed ordinances prohibiting sleeping in cars overnight. This sparked the administration to allocate twelve spaces near the Social Sciences Farm. Occupants were required to have insurance on the vehicle and sign an occupancy agreement. It was named, “Irvine Meadows.”

Student reading outside of his RV in the newly opened Irvine Meadows, circa 1974

Student reading outside of his RV in the newly opened Irvine Meadows, circa 1974. From UCI Communications photographs, AS-061, a74-061

By 1976, over 33% of students commuted ten miles or more to get to campus. On-campus housing was completely full and had a waitlist of 1200 students. Irvine Meadows, meant as a temporary location, still existed even though it did not provide utilities or any extra facilities. It had a wait list of over 100 people. With a growing student body the administration again faced a student housing crisis. Administrators including Chancellor Dan Aldrich and the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs approved a proposal for a site to accommodate 100 vehicles and build bathroom and laundry facilities. In July 1977, the Board of Regents approved funding for the expanded RV park and, after several roadblocks, opened “Irvine Meadows West” on November 15, 1979.

Proposed site for RV park, 1976.

Proposed site for RV park, 1976. AS-004, Central Records. Box 199, Folder: 935-10

Upon opening, the new RV park did not live up to the original vision nor students’ expectations. The original plan included 100-units, a community building for meeting areas, a kitchen, indoor pool, outdoor recreation facilities and vegetable garden, and complete irrigation and landscaping. The actual site included space for 80 vehicles, a small service building with laundry facilities, and no outdoor recreation, garden, or landscaping. “It’s really no picnic living here,” said John Marinovich, quoted in the New U just weeks after the opening. The first residents reported numerous problems with poor construction and inadequate facilities.

However, by 1982 it was a popular housing alternative and deemed a success by the director of housing and food services. Landscaping was added and it exuded an off-beat, bohemian charm with colorful trailers and a vibrant community. There were plans to expand it, but these were never carried out. In 1999, the administration announced that Irvine Meadows would close in five years. In July 2004, Irvine Meadows closed to make room for new construction.

Irvine Meadows West, circa 1988

Irvine Meadows West, circa 1988. From UCI Communications photographs, AS-061, a88-804

Student in his RV, circa 1974

Student in his RV, circa 1974. From UCI Communications photographs, AS-061, a74-061_001

Early UCI Landscaping November 30, 2014

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus, University Archives.
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In 1965, while the campus grounds were being prepared for the first trees and plants, the campus landscape architects viewed some of their options for the first plantings. With the help of the University’s Agricultural Field Station near El Toro, seeds and cuttings from Southern California and from botanical gardens in the area were prepared for planting on campus.

Aldrich Park (formerly Campus Park) being prepared for new landscaping in 1965.

Aldrich Park (formerly Campus Park) being prepared for new landscaping in 1965.

Campus landscape architects at the Agricultural Field Station near El Toro.

Campus landscape architects at the Agricultural Field Station near El Toro.

Don’t disappear! September 29, 2014

Posted by ucisca in School spirit, Student Life, Uncategorized, University Archives.
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Special Collections & Archives spent the day at the annual Anteater Involvement Fair! Zot!

Our motivation: to preserve UCI history! The University Archives (at the UCI Libraries!) wants to preserve your student organization records! Any material including constitutions, by-laws, photos, posters, meeting minutes… whether physical or digital, including facebook sites, instagram feeds, and photos straight from your camera, we’re ready for everything! If there’s anythng you don’t need anymore, don’t throw it out! Send it to the library!

Here’s the super attractive, bright pink flyer we handed out, which has a lot more information:

Don't disappear!

Don’t disappear!

Zot!

Representing our UCI pride! Zot!

Gotta catch 'em all!

Gotta catch ’em all!

Visit our website for more information on how to transfer your student organization records: http://special.lib.uci.edu/donate/donating-records-so.html

Chancellor Peltason at the UCI-UTC bridge dedication August 29, 2014

Posted by ucisca in Photographs, School spirit, Uncategorized, University Archives.
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Happy birthday, Chancellor Peltason! Hope your birthday is as joyous and eventful as this moment in UC Irvine history!

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Chancellor Peltason crosses the UCI-UTC bridge. Also pictured, Chancellor Aldrich, Peter the Anteater, and Aldrich Hall (Administration building). From the University Communications Photographs [AS-061].

This photo was taken during the 1986 UCI-UTC Bridge Dedication. The outfits worn by many of the attendees suggest that this may have occured during UCI’s annual Wayzgoose celebration.

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Chancellor Peltason at the UCI-UTC Bridge Dedication. From the University Communications Photographs [AS-061].

This pedestrian bridge was built through a partnership between the City of Irvine and the Irvine Company to connect the University Town Center and the UC Irvine campus. The $1,000,000 bridge symbolized the relationship between the campus and the community at large.

It has also been stated by Sam McCulloch, our favorite Australian historian, that during this dedication ceremony, “Chancellor Peltason entertained the audience of University and community leaders with a remarkable yo-yo demonstration”.

Does anyone have any video evidence of this? Please do share. Here are some photos!

(One more thing to note! This bridge now goes by the name, Watson Bridge, named for Ray Watson, original architect and former President of The Irvine Company. This bridge was dedicated on October 27, 2005.)

Congrats 2014! June 13, 2014

Posted by ucisca in Photographs, University Archives, Zot!.
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Congratulations to the class of 2014!

The biggest commencement in UCI history is finally just one day away! Are you graduating folks ready for this? What about your guests? Check the section on security for a list of permitted and prohibited items and make plans to stay cool, hydrated, and be sure to slab on some sunscreen! It’s going to be a long day in the sun!

30 years ago, commencement guests wore umbrella hats to the 1984 Commencement. Hands free with an incredible shade radius — what stylish and functional piece will make its mark in 2014?

Commencement guests wearing umbrella hats, the “it” piece of the 80s.

Commencement guests wearing umbrella hats, the “it” piece of the 80s.

Photo from AS-061. University Communications photographs. Special Collections and Archives, The UC Irvine Libraries, Irvine, California.

Vietnam War Moratorium, October 15, 1969 May 14, 2014

Posted by ucisca in Activism, Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus, University Archives.
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On October 15, 1969, the Vietnam War Moratorium was held across the country, as a national attempt to end the Vietnam War. On the UCI campus, alternative education classes were held in Aldrich Park (then called Campus Park) throughout the day. A rally was held at noon in Gateway Plaza. There was a march to nearby institutions involved in war production and research, and the day ended with a memorial service for those who had died in the war. Below are photographs of the rally and flyers regarding the Moratorium and the schedule of alternative education classes and other activities.

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Moratorium Bulletin #1, announcing the Moratorium.

Moratorium Bulletin #1, announcing the Moratorium.

Alternative education and activities schedule.

Alternative education and activities schedule.

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