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The first Frisbee on this date in 1957, and Ultimate Frisbee at Crawford Field in 1980 January 23, 2016

Posted by ucisca in Athletics, Campus Scenes, Uncategorized.
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On this date, January 23rd, in 1957, the Wham-O toy company issued the first Frisbee.

In Bridgeport, Connecticut, William Frisbie opened the Frisbie Pie Company in 1871. Students from nearby universities would throw the empty pie tins to each other, yelling “Frisbie!” In 1948, Walter Frederick Morrison and his partner Warren Franscioni invented a plastic version of the disc called the “Flying Saucer” that could fly further and more accurately than the tin pie plates. After splitting with Franscioni, Morrison made an improved model in 1955 and sold it to the new toy company Wham-O as the “Pluto Platter”–an attempt to cash in on the public craze over space and Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs).

In 1958, a year after the toy’s first release, Wham-O changed the name to the Frisbee disc, misspelling the name of the historic pie company. A company designer, Ed Headrick, patented the design for the modern Frisbee in December 1967, adding a band of raised ridges on the disc’s surface–called the Rings–to stabilize flight. By aggressively marketing Frisbee-playing as a new sport, Wham-O sold over 100 million units of its famous toy by 1977.

High school students in Maplewood, New Jersey, invented Ultimate Frisbee in 1967. UCI students have always been addicted to the various Frisbee games that have been invented over the years, from Ultimate Frisbee (shown in the photos above in 1980), to Frisbee Golf, Freestyle Frisbee, etc.

Today, at least 60 manufacturers produce the flying discs–generally made out of plastic and measuring roughly 20-25 centimeters (8-10 inches) in diameter with a curved lip. The official Frisbee is owned by Mattel Toy Manufacturers, who bought the toy from Wham-O in 1994.

Janis Joplin and Big Brother & the Holding Company January 8, 2011

Posted by ucisca in Campus Scenes, Early UCI Campus, Student Life.
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Big Brother & the Holding Company played for a dance in Campus Hall (now Crawford Hall) on Friday, September 27, 1968. Morning Glory was the opening band and lights were by Thomas Edison & Castle Lighting. Tickets were $3.50.  The New University called Big Brother “San Francisco’s only true heavies.”

AS-061.  University Communications Photographs. Special Collections and Archives, the U.C. Irvine Libraries, Irvine, California.

Early Crawford Hall Concerts & Events March 4, 2010

Posted by ucisca in Early UCI Campus, Student Life, Uncategorized.
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Looking back at early UCI concerts and events, some real legends of the rock, jazz, funk, and folk music scenes, as well as many popular speakers of that era, performed or spoke at Crawford Hall. Those who came to Crawford in the 1960s and 1970s included Dick Gregory, Led Zeppelin, Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Huey P. Newton, William F. Buckley, Steve Miller Band, John Mayall, Eldridge Cleaver, San Francisco Mime Troup, Charles Lloyd Quartet, Art Buchwald, Sir Douglas Quintet, Buddy Miles Express, Nina Simone, The Kinks, Laura Niro, Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band, Flying Burrito Brothers, Dr. Sidney Cohen, Pharoah Sanders, Kool and the Gang, Aman Folk Ensemble, Dr. Jane Goodall, Zubin Mehta and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Jimmy Webb, Merce Cunningham Dance Company, Hedge and Donna, Daniel Ellsberg, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Earth Wind and Fire, John Stewart, Timothy Leary, and many many others.

University of California, Irvine Poster Collection, 1965-2006. AS-050. Special Collections and Archives, The UC Irvine Libraries, Irvine, California

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